REMNANTS OF THE PAST

 

EXHIBITION

 

ARTWORKS

Acrylic on canvas

A GLANCE INTO ENRICHED PAST
A GLANCE INTO ENRICHED PAST

Price: $ 500 AUD, Size: 30'x 20' inch

A SURREPTITIOUS GLANCE INTO PAST
A SURREPTITIOUS GLANCE INTO PAST

Price : $ 1000 AUD, Size: 30'x40' inch

UNTOLD GRANDEUR, AMIDST RUINS
UNTOLD GRANDEUR, AMIDST RUINS

Sold

BEQUEST, WOVEN IN CAST IRON
BEQUEST, WOVEN IN CAST IRON

Size:16'x 20' inch

PRISTINE PAST
PRISTINE PAST

Size: 16'x12' inch

ENFOLDED IN MAJESTIC PAST
ENFOLDED IN MAJESTIC PAST

Not for sale

SHADOWS ON THE CORRIDOR
SHADOWS ON THE CORRIDOR

SOLD

PRIDE OF OLD DHAKA, BORO KATRA
PRIDE OF OLD DHAKA, BORO KATRA

Price: $ 300 AUD

PRIDE OF OLD DHAKA, BORO KATRA
PRIDE OF OLD DHAKA, BORO KATRA

Price: $ 450 AUD, Size 36'x18' inch

EULOGY, ON ILLUSTRIOUS FACADE
EULOGY, ON ILLUSTRIOUS FACADE

Price: $ 600 AUD, Size: 36'x18' inch

UNCELEBRATED LEGACY
UNCELEBRATED LEGACY

Price : $ 500 AUD, Size: 20'x12' inch

UNCELEBRATED LEGACY
UNCELEBRATED LEGACY

Price: $ 850 AUD, Size: 24'x 30' inch

CONCEALED IN EXHILARATION
CONCEALED IN EXHILARATION

SOLD

FORGOTTEN STORY
FORGOTTEN STORY

Price: $200 AUD, Size: 19.5'x19.5

 

STORY

This series 'Remnants of the Past' is created collaborating with  Usayed K Mahmood a US based photographer to create a global awareness on conservation of heritage architectures. 

The artworks represents Mughal/ Colonial-inspired ostentatious heritage architectures built around 15th century in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The depiction is reflects the architectures of Panam City in Sonargaon and Boro Katra in Old Dhaka, Bangladesh, showcasing the sparsity of the structures that requires our love and respect. The art representation is a dialogue to evoke emotions that these architectures hold for both Bangladeshi and Non-Bangladeshi alike collectively.

A part of the sale proceeds are donated to UNHRC to support the educational supplies for the children struck by Rohingya crisis in Bangladesh.

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BACKGROUND

Over the last few decades there has been a significant development in the preservation and importance of intangible cultural heritage. Smith, L et al. sheds light on the conservation activities that are being taken due to the growing change of modernization and globalization which is threatening the natural environments, archaeological sites, traditional buildings, arts and crafts.


World Heritage Convention (WHC) that took place in 1972 embodied an understanding of the cultural and natural heritage values through conceptualizing policies and practices. Smith. L et al. addresses the issue on ‘the dominance of the West, and in particular Western Europe, within UNESCO policy is well documented (Byrne 1991; Cleere 2001; Matsuura 2001; Yoshida 2004) and the ICHC has been defined as part of the response to address that imbalance (Aikawa 2004; Bedjaoui 2004; Schmitt 2008)’.

According to Dilkhosh, A, et al. some of the most ostentatious and skillful architecture of Bangladesh were demonstrated and created during Pre-Mughal and Mughal periods. Mughal architectures reigned supremely in the Indian Sub Continent including Bangladesh for over five and half centuries from 12th -18th Century. The capital city of Bangladesh, Dhaka is considered to be the city of Mosques.


In 2014, I was relocated in Dhaka, Bangladesh for two years. During that period of time I was surprised to see how old heritage buildings were taken over by modern structures. What disturbed me was the fact that the buildings were probably not even documented properly due to the lack of resources and government initiative. This led me to think deep. Coincidently my friend, Usayed was in town. We shared and exchanged our views. I saw some of his photography collection on Panam city, Located in Sonargoan. Where he emphasized on the ruins and present condition of Panam Nagor. I was deeply intrigued. I started doing my own research by visiting the sites physically.


My visit to Old Dhaka made me realize how most heritage buildings are suffering from structural failure, rising damp, biological insect damage and some man made destruction. Overwhelmed, by the situation without thinking further I started to paint and document as I thought that was the only way to confront the situation.


The collection of artwork showcases different fragments of Panam City, Sonargoan and Boro Katra in Old Dhaka highlighting the uncelebrated architectural structure which are a significant part of our history.


According  to 2006 and 2008 World Monuments Watch-the capital of the fifteenth-century Bengal ruler Isa Khan, and once an important trading and political center, Sonargaon boasts architecture of the Sultanate, Mughal, and colonial periods. Today it is considered  among 100 endangered heritage sites.

 The low-lying terrain of Bangladesh is especially vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, particularly flood and rising sea level. The other threats are vandalism, unauthorized occupation, illegal development, poor maintenance and earthquakes.


Very recently there has been a restoration on Boro Shardar Bari in  Panam City, Sonargaon. The restoration project was funded by a foreign company based in Bangladesh under the supervision Dr. Abu Sayeed M. Ahmed, head of the Department of Architecture at the University of Asia Pacific (Dhaka).This foreign collaboration of restoration project gave an exposure to the world how we can come forward and conserve our heritage architectures and think beyond boarders.


We also need creative individuals to document them in the form of art and archive information about these important structures, which are an important part of our history. We need this for posterity, that in the event of any destruction or natural disaster, we have something to reflect on and leave as a legacy to our future generation.

My research and paintings focuses on the neglected heritage sites in Bangladesh as an art practice and its importance of documentation as an intangible cultural heritage. 


According to Sullivan, G when systems and structures are put in place across communities, states and nations then a sobering realization asserts on our intrinsic connectivity. I intend to redefine this connection through demonstrated creative practice and through my research.


Citations:


Dilkhosh, A, Nawawi N, M, & Saleh, N, H ‘A Preliminary Review on design conservation of Mughal mosque architecture in Dhaka: A Case study between

khan Muhammad Mridha Mosque and Rasulallah’s (PBUH) Prototype Mosque in Madina’, ARPN Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences [online journal], Vol 12, no. 20, May 2017, http://www.arpnjournals.org/jeas/research_papers/rp_2017/jeas_1017_6423.pdf, accessed 5Nov 2018.


G, Sullivan,’ Introduction: Reviewing Visual Arts Research’,

2nd ed, ‘Art Practice as Research: Inquiry in Visual Arts’, Sage Publication, Inc. USA, 1951, p. xxi.


K, Howard, Music as Intangible Cultural heritage, Taylor & Francis, 2016, pp.1-267, Deakin Library [online database], accessed 5 Nov. 2018.


L.Smith & N,Akagawa, ’ Series General Co-Editors’ Foreword’,

1st edn, ‘Intangible Heritage’, Taylor & Francis, London, 2009, p. 1-336.


UNESCO, ‘Protecting our Heritage and Fostering Creativity ’, United Nations, Education, Scientific & Cultural Organization

[Website], < https://en.unesco.org/themes/protecting-our-heritage-and-fostering-creativity>, accessed 9 Nov 2018.

WMF(World Monument Fund), ' 2006 & 2008 World Monument Watch', Sonargoan-Panam City, <https://www.wmf.org/project/sonargaon-panam-city>, accessed 12 Jan 2019.